Archive for 2012

Last Image Processed For 2012

Posted in Image Post with tags , , , , , on December 31, 2012 by Art of Photography

This is from a family shoot and represent the last processed image of 2012 for Art of Photography. I will be posting an online version of my 2012 book in the near future but those are completed works.
Have a great 2013 and I hope you remember 2012 fondly.

Heart

Dave Hill Effect

Posted in Editorial, Image Post with tags , , on December 29, 2012 by Art of Photography

You may have heard of the Dave Hill effect but wasn’t sure what that meant. Dave Hill is a digital artist who makes incredible compositions out of hundreds of Photoshop layers. The resulting images have an easily discernible style about them.
Many artists would like to emulate this style but do not have the time, skills, or inclination to do all the work involved. So they have experimented with various Photoshop settings that can make something close in appearance but is easy to apply. So much of this has been done (and displayed) that it is now a known look referred to as the ‘Dave Hill effect’.

A normal image such as this
DaveHillEffectBefore

Becomes something like this

DaveHillEffectAfter

(it is sometimes also referred to as an HDR look).
And so, now you know!

Snow Expected Tonight

Posted in Image Post with tags , , , on December 27, 2012 by Art of Photography

Here is my defense against the coming storm…

ComeToTheIslandsstroked

Merry Christmas

Posted in Event, Image Post with tags , , , , on December 23, 2012 by Art of Photography
Merry Christmas 2012

Merry Christmas 2012

(LOL – O hell no, that’s not me! Just a pretty girl for Christmas)

12-21-2012 and Still Here

Posted in Event, General Post with tags , , , , on December 21, 2012 by Art of Photography

For those who do not live in the region, there was a small storm in the U.S. Midwest yesterday.

Lancaster Storm 2012

Peace on Earth, Good Will To All Men and Women!

For Irfanview Users

Posted in Tip or Trick Post with tags , , on December 18, 2012 by Art of Photography

(This post is for experienced users, especially those familiar with *.ini files)

Have you taken the plunge and installed Irfanview? Or are you a long time user (it has been around since 1996) who still thinks it is one of the best image editors for quick jobs. If you are one of these, this post could be the Christmas gift you have always wanted.

70s effect

I recently received a comment from Disguy who reminded me that you can edit the *.ini file for Irfanview. Specifically he was talking about the settings I had posted for re-creating some of the current popular photo filters. Anyway, by using the function Color Correction Profiles, you can instantly apply the settings you want without having to refer to any kind of guide.

Lancaster Courthouse Dome, Grant County, Wisconsin

Lancaster Courthouse Dome, Grant County, Wisconsin

What we are going to talk about makes use of Color Correction Profiles. If you are not familiar with these, select Image >> Color Correction (or Shift + G). This brings up a dialog box that allows you to (among other things) specify brightness, gamma, color channels, contrast, and other image rending settings. In the bottom left of this panel you will see color profiles (newer versions of Irfanview, I am not sure when exactly this started). To use a profile you first have to set some. Once they exist, you click the drop down and select the profile you want then click the LOAD button. So, for the nine (9) sets of setting I gave in my earlier post, you could set up each one in the interface and then assign it a profile name.
OR
Find the file i_view32.ini (%appdata%\irfanview) on your computer and open/edit it. Scroll to the end. If you have not set up any profiles, just copy this to the file and save it (you may want to save a copy of the file first before making any changes).
[ColorCorrection]
Profile_70s=1;0|10|50|-5|5|-50|;1.10;
Profile_Chrome=1;0|75|-25|-5|-20|0|;1.10;
Profile_Polaroid=1;0|0|0|25|30|5|;1.10;
Profile_C41=1;0|0|25|15|30|80|;0.80;
Profile_CrossProcess=1;0|40|-75|35|35|-50|;0.80;
Profile_RedScale=1;0|-10|-50|65|30|-50|;0.80;
Profile_Lomish=1;0|75|-100|35|10|-60|;0.75;
Profile_SkipBleach=1;0|10|-125|70|60|115|;0.45;
Profile_Brownie=1;0|0|35|30|5|100|;0.90;
Profiles=70s|Chrome|Polaroid|C41|CrossProcess|RedScale|Lomish|SkipBleach|Brownie|

Now when you open a picture in Irfanview and go to the Color Correction panel you will see all these profiles listed in the drop down. If you already have some profiles set up follow this procedure.
1. Under [ColorCorrection] paste all the entries that start Profile_profilename=1;…
2. Find the entry that lists the Profiles by name and add the new names to the list (separated by the | symbol). How they are listed is how they show up in the drop down.

SeniorPics1

If you haven’t modified *.ini files before, just go slow and make sure you know what is being asked for before you take the action. If you save a copy of the original, you can just rename it back to i_view32.ini if you run into problems. Good luck to all!

Sometimes It Is The Little Things

Posted in Image Post, Photoshop Tutorial with tags , , , on December 16, 2012 by Art of Photography

Hi all, it has been awhile. For my Christian friends, I hope the holiday preparations are going well.

This picture was given to me recently.

Lauren

It is a great example of photographic experimentation. The artist has been creative with an otherwise straight-up portrait. However, it is not finished. It is my belief that pictures you want to display are the ones that address all the principles and elements of style (even if addressing means not fulfilling some aspect of these guides). I cannot recommend strongly enough that any serious camera operator learn these ‘rules’ just as those who paint or sculpt incorporate them into their creations. With the plethora of cameras out there these days, if you want to stand out, you have to create a more complete image.

Trying not to affect the foreground image, here is my alterations for a picture that would be used in a digital manner (online article, website, blog?)

Lauren2

I like to think I have put the picture into a context the human viewer understands. Or maybe it is just more interesting or more focused. Anyway, one cannot say it is better without being judgmental, so let me say I feel this is more complete. And remember, all art is editing until you stop.

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