Archive for retro

Instagram in Irfanview

Posted in Image Post, Photoshop Tutorial, Tip or Trick Post with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 6, 2012 by Art of Photography

I have blogged before about a great free program for image processing with the unusual name of Irfanview. This is, in my opinion, the best image manipulation program you can use until you step up to Photoshop (or possibly GIMP). Today’s blog is about using Irfanview to re-create some classic film and dark-room trick photo effects.
These settings can only be used in Irfanview (http://cnet.co/wrue83) but do not require the extra plug-ins package.
Ready to go!?!
With an image loaded into Irfanview, type a capital G (shift + G) or go to Image >> color corrections … in the menu options. This opens up a dialog with a before and after of your current image. On the left side you will find controls for Brightness and Color balance (Red/Green/Blue). The right side has controls for Contrast, Gamma, and Saturation. We will modify six (6) of these controls (I never touch Brightness, Gamma is way much better).
Note that these settings are not absolutes and you can always tweak them depending on the picture they are being applied to. They are a starting point however I recommend you do apply all the settings for the effect before you start tweaking.
The format for the filter instructions is ; Red, Green, Blue, Contrast, Gamma, Saturation.

Original Image

70’s; -5, 5, -50, 10, 1.1, 50

Chrome; -5, -20, 0, 75, 1.1, -25

Polaroid; 25, 30, 5, 0, 1.1, 0

C-41; 15, 30, 80, 0, .8, 25

CrossProcess; 35, 35, -50, 40, .8, -75

RedScale; 65, 30, -50, -10, .8, -50

Lomish; 35, 10, -60, 75, .75, -100

SkipBleach; 70, 60, 115, 10, .45, -125

Brownie; 30, 5, 100, 0, .9, 35

Notes:
Chrome is meant to emulate KodaChrome color reversal film
C-41 relates to ‘normal’ color film processing (the main Kodak chemical is named C-41)
Cross Process, Red Scale and Skip Bleach are based on deliberate chemical misapplication techniques.
Brownie is based on 126 films.
70’s is based on time eroded prints.
Polaroid is emulating Polaroid’s emulsion.
Lomish incorporates some of the elements found in the output of the cheap Russian Lomo cameras.

Hope you find these useful and that you have a good time playing with them. Let me know if you run into problems or don’t understand something I wrote.

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